.
Skip to content.
Skip to content.
Meetings Calendar 2006
January
.
February
.
March
.
April
.
May
.
June
.
March
  Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su  
 
.
.
1
.
2
.
3
.
4
.
5
.
 
  6
.
7
.
8
.
9
.
10
.
11
.
12
.
 
  13
.
14
.
15
.
16
.
17
.
18
.
19
.
 
  20
.
21
.
22
.
23
.
24
.
25
.
26
.
 
  27
.
28
.
29
.
30
.
31
.
.
.
 
 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
 
 
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
 
Service
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

The discussion

 

In the subsequent discussion, Cristian David (of Romania), amongst others, stressed the significance of a decision-making process that was close to EU citizens, and added that Romania, as a candidate country, had already taken decisive steps towards decentralization in order to facilitate the implementation of European policy. At European level, it was necessary to ensure that full recognition was given to the local and regional authorities.

Hannes Manninen (Finland) referred to the considerable importance of the subsidiarity principle at local level in Finland, but added that the regional level could be expanded further in the EU. He announced a particular focus on the subsidiarity principle by the upcoming Finnish Presidency.

Herbert Sausgruber (Austria) made critical mention of a "construction flaw" in the EU and said that the various ministers were often exposed to lobbying and tended to go too far. By contrast, the small entities had considerable mobilising force. In his view, the EU should develop standards and principles, but not enact an excess of detailed rules. On the other hand, subsidiarity also meant for Sausgruber that the larger entity must act where the smaller entity cannot.

Jan Zahradnik (Czech Republic) referred to the renewed strength of the regions in the Czech Republic and in particular praised the positive collaboration between South Bohemia and Upper Austria. From the point of view of the Czech regions, it was time to develop the subsidiarity principle further and to strengthen the status of the regional entities.

Angela Orthner (Austria) saw the regions as being co-creators and co-decision-makers and argued that, before each Community action, not only the economic consequences but also the political consequences must be assessed. She further urged that the ratification process for the EU Constitution be completed and said that if this is not possible, then as much as possible of its content "should be saved".

Karl-Heinz Klär (Germany) said that, if they were asked, citizens would not expect subsidiarity from the EU, but "good politics". Accordingly, the secret lay in close collaboration in a spirit of trust between the various levels.

Franz Schausberger (Austria) argued that a country which has as federalist a slant as Austria has a pioneering role to play in implementing the subsidiarity principle. Moreover, he considered subsidiarity and regionalization as being vital to the solution of the problems in the Balkans. In his view, local and regional self-government should be criteria for accession to the EU.

Erwin Pröll (Austria) summed up in his closing address that subsidiarity was one of the keys to democratic coexistence, particularly for the so-called young democracies. From this he derived the task for Brussels of viewing decentralization and regionalization as a mission serving to guarantee long-term peace in Europe. Rather pithily, he added that politicians should not fall into the trap of turning to their lawyers when they ran out of ideas. Subsidiarity was the inherent task of politicians, and it was up to them to help it win through.

 

Date: 20.04.2006